Saturday, May 16, 2015

Cariboo Portraits C.D. Hoy and C.S. Wing An Amazing Photographic Legacy of Early 20th Century Cariboo Life

Cariboo Photographers C.D. Hoy & C.S. Wing
Saturday, May 23, 2015, 1:15 pm – 2:15 pm at the Quesnel Museum.
Lorna Townsend & Susan Susan Smith-Josephy will discuss the photographs of C.D. Hoy and C.S. Wing and reveal the stories of a few of their subjects. 

By the early 20th century, most communities in the province had professional photographers recording the lives of prominent citizens through portraiture. Quesnel, oddly enough, boasted two resident photographers during this time, both of them Chinese, and both prominent pioneers beyond their photographic legacy

By the early 20th century, most communities in the province had professional photographers recording the lives of prominent citizens through portraiture. Quesnel, oddly enough, boasted two resident photographers during this time, both of them Chinese, and both prominent pioneers beyond their photographic legacy. The similarities between Wing and Hoy’s aesthetic creativity, coupled with an unusual familiarity with their subjects, affords us a unique and intimate glimpse into the early 20th century lives of Quesnel’s First Nations, Chinese and European pioneers. Come and learn about the lives of these two amazing photographers and their subjects.
Lorna Townsend earned a Masters degree in history from the University of Northern British Columbia. She has been an active volunteer with both the Quesnel Museum & Heritage Commission and the Friends of the Museum, preparing several of their publications. For the past decade she has particularly been interested in researching and writing about Quesnel’s Chinese Community.

Susan Smith-Josephy's first book, Lillian Alling: the journey home is a true account about a woman who, in the 1920s, walked from New York to Siberia via Canada and Alaska. Susan has a degree in History from Simon Fraser University, and also studied journalism at Langara College. Her next non-fiction book is about Jean Caux, the famed packer, who is known in British Columbia as Cataline.

Cost: Free with museum admission/membership (otherwise $5)

British Columbia History Authors' Fair, Quesnel, May 23

This Saturday, May 23, at the Quesnel Library come and visit some of your favourite British Columbian history authors. From 1-4:30 authors will be available to talk about their books, and books will be available for signing and for purchase. From 3:30-4:30 there will be author readings in the library’s program room. Join us to meet the authors, and enjoy a coffee and cake. Free admission.

Authors attending
Lily Chow was born in Malaysia, but has lived in Canada since the mid-sixties. She has taught in the Prince George School District and at the University of Northern British Columbia. She now devotes her time to researching and writing. Her first book, Sojourners in the North, won the Jeanne Clarke history award and is used in many colleges and universities as a reference text.

Her Books:
Sojourners in the North
Chasing Their Dreams
Legends of Four Chinese Sages
Blood and Sweat over the Railroad Tracks 


Well-known local photographer and author of:
Motherstone
Spirit in the Grass
The Bowron Lakes
Flyover
The Cariboo Chilcotin Coast

92 year old Rudy Johnson has a lot of tales to tell, and he’s now got them down in print. His personal journey is detailed in his book, “Rudy Johnson.” The book tells about Rudy’s life from the time he was born in 1922, his move to Canada and the Cariboo, and of course tells about the famous bridge which bears his name.




Tom Lymbery
"Tom’s Gray Creek – a Kootenay Lake Memoir” covers the years 1911 to 1945 when sternwheelers were still an essential part of transportation on Kootenay Lake.  With the success of attracting tourists to Banff and Lake Louise the Canadian Pacific Railway constructed 3 large steamers on Kootenay, Arrow and Okanagan. This became the only place in the world where a sternwheeler carried a daily Greyhound bus, carefully balanced across the bow. Tom Lymbery and his sister, Alice grew up running the phone messages to Captain Malcolm MacKinnon and also to the Greyhound drivers.  Dismantled material from that Balfour Hotel was used by Tom’s father to build Gray Creek Store, a family business still flourishing after 102 years. This book has 205 previously unpublished photos and other documents such as Pacific Coast Militia Rangers dog tags and information about the Japanese Fire Balloons



Richard Mackie the Associate Editor and Book Reviews Editor at BC Studies, a quarterly journal dedicated to the exploration of British Columbia's cultural, economic, and political life, past and present. An archaeologist and an historian, Richard has written the following books:
Home Truths: Highlights from BC History (editor)
Mountain Timber: The Comox Logging Company in the Vancouver Island Mountains
Island Timber: A Social History of the Comox Logging Company, Vancouver Island
Trading Beyond the Mountains: The British Fur Trade on the Pacific, 1793-1843
The Wilderness Profound:  Victorian Life on the Gulf of Georgia
Hamilton Mack Laing:  Hunter-Naturalist

Richard Wright
With more books to his credit than it's possible to list in this space, Richard Wright is a Barkerville local treasure. The two books he's best known for are Barkerville and the Cariboo Goldfields and Overlanders: The epic cross-Canada treks for gold, 1858-1862. In addition to being at this year's Authors' Fair, Richard will also be the Keynote Speaker at this year's BC Historical Federation conference.






Susan Smith-Josephy (that's me!)
A writer and researcher based in Quesnel. Her first book, Lillian Alling: the journey home is a true account about a woman who, in the 1920s, walked from New York to Siberia via Canada and Alaska. Her second book, a biography of Cataline (Jean Caux), the famed British Columbian mule train packer, will be out next year.